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Corydoras paleatus (Jenyns, 1842)

Image contributors to this species:

Danny Blundell (2) Michael McGeogegan (1) Sandy Milne (2) Allan James (3) Chris Ralph (2) Joost Schuitemaker (1) Johnny Jensen's Photographic Library (3)

ScotCat Sources:

Factsheet Article Art Gallery Art Gallery Etymology = Genus Etymology = species

Other Sources:

Fishbase  Google Search  All Catfish Species Inventory
 

Relevant Information:

This is one of the first Corydoras species, along with C. aeneus to be bred in the aquarium and was the mainstay of the catfish side of the hobby in the early years when the hobby of fishkeeping took off with the arrival of easier air travel importation in the late fifties, early sixties. It was in fact first bred in Paris, France, by Pière Carbonier way back in 1878. There is another claim to fame for this Corydoras in that it was first discovered by Charles Darwin on his famous five year voyage on the Beagle in 1831-36. There is also a C. paleatus albino form that is now being bred in the hobby. Remarks: Thumbnails 7 & 8* depict a member of the so called "Paleatus Group", C. marmoratus, which sports black edgings to the dorsal, anal and ventral fins. C. marmoratus is still regarded as a synomyn of C. paleatus but may turn out in the future to be a species in its own right. Diet: A good quality flake food and tablet food for adults with sparodic feedings of frozen or live food will keep your Corydoras in good health. See Factsheet for more information.

Common Name:

Peppered Corydoras

Synonyms:

Callichthys paleatus, Corydoras maculatus, Corydoras marmoratos, Corydoras punctatus var. argentina, Corydoras microcephalus (?)

Family:

Callichthyidaemblycipitidae

Distribution:

South America: Argentina : Rivers and streams around Buenos Aires. Uruguay: Streams around Montevideo

Size:

Males: 6.5cm ( 2½ins) Female: 7.5cm (3ins)

Temp:

22-26°C (71-79°F)

p.H.

6.0 -7.2.

Reference:

ScotCat Factsheet no. 89. Nov. 2003

 

 

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                                                                                                   updated = October 13, 2017 © ScotCat 1997-2017