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Corydoras adolfoi


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#1 reticulata

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Posted 30 June 2005 - 05:15 AM

Does anyone have experience in breeding adolfoi? If so I would love to hear from you. Thank you.

#2 medaka

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Posted 30 June 2005 - 09:48 PM

Hi
:)

there is an article in scot cats breeding section on them
C, adolfoi
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#3 mona o

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Posted 14 August 2006 - 01:17 PM

Yes, I have:-)
My group of 8 wild caught C.adolfoi spawned for the first time in my tank only 3 weeks after purchasing them. In those 3 weeks, I provided lots of nutritous and varied food (frozen) such as red mosq. larvae, freezedried tubifex, sinking Hikari Cory food tablets, frozen brine shrimps and so on. JBL Krill flake food now and then as well. Tried to not give the same food two days in a row for variety.

The tank is not very bright lighted, only one light tube of that kind you use for plants (kind of pinkish light in them). They seem to feel safest when the light is not to bright. Roots for cover, and a lot of fast growing plants. Sand at the bottom as substrate.

I usually changed 10% of the water each or every second day, and kept the ph at 6.7.
The hardness isn't much to talk about in my tap water, kH is 1 and gH is 1 or 2. Very soft in other words.

After the first spawning there has been little efforts made to make them spawn again... they do it anyway:)
They spawn almost constantly, and have been doing so for 7 months now. Only a short break for 3 weeks in february, but then they started again and have spawned EVERY week since then....
I have raised some of the fry, and currently I have about 20 about 5 and 6 months old. I stopped picking out the eggs before the summer started, since vacation was coming up.

The adults usually eat the eggs stuck on the glass, but the ones in the java moss they seem to leave alone.
It's always only one breeding pair at the time (one female and one male) The rest of the group does not participate. The spawning pair themselves never eat eggs, but the rest will if given the chance, so I usually sit guard and pick the eggs one by one as they lay them:-) (what a job...)

My best tip for hatching the eggs is to take a filter stocking, stuff it with peat, and leave it in the hatching container. So far, no eggs has fungused with this method biggrin.gif
But remember to change the water a day before hatching! The water gets very acid with the peat, and it's best to change it before hatching since it's much more difficult to make any changes at all AFTER the fry has emerged. They can die even if the temperature changes as little as 2 celsius degrees... Very sensitive fry in other woords.

I feed my fry with freshly hatched brine shrimps the first four to five weeks, then I slowly introduse other foods. C. adolfoi can be hard to raise if you don't feed them newly hatched brine shrimp, because they don't touch other foods, in my experience. They just die of starvation....
And keep the tank CLEAN. Daily water changes of 95%. Sounds much, but it does the trick. Remember to keep both temperature and ph at the same on the new water as the water in the tank! I also clean the tank every day the first weeks, by scrubbing it in hot water. Much work, but the survival rate is high:)

My first brood of C. adolfoi had a 100% survival rate with these methods:-) (this was my first try ever at breeding Corys...)
I picked out 11 eggs, 9 of them hatched, and all 9 are now happily swimming around in one of my tanks.
They are 6 months now.

#4 scotcat

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Posted 14 August 2006 - 08:36 PM

First of all welcome to the SC forums and I hope you enjoy your stay here. smile.gif

Well done on the adolfoi breeding and the great write up. I've not bred them myself but I am aware that they are pretty slow growing.
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#5 mona o

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Posted 14 August 2006 - 09:03 PM

Attached File  5_uker_gml_Corydoras_Adolfoi2.jpg   50.68KB   24 downloadsAttached File  5_uker_gml_corydoras_adolfoi7.jpg   45.76KB   25 downloads

I have plenty of photos, from all stages of the Corydoras adolfoi fry development.

This photo is taken when they were 5 weeks old.
The colour change started about here, but got stronger around 6 weeks, and by 7 weeks you could clearly see who the parents were:)

#6 mona o

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Posted 14 August 2006 - 09:16 PM

I'm not sure how to post images directly in the posts here (I have a Photo Bucket account) so I'll just have
to add them as attachments for now:-)

The first of these two photos (on the left) shows a one day old fry, with yolk sac.
The second photo shows a five day old fry with a belly full of newly hatched brine shrimp.
Nice and orange colour on the belly biggrin.gif

Attached Files



#7 scotcat

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Posted 17 August 2006 - 10:33 AM

Hi Mona,

I am in the middle of producing your article but the more I look at your adults I am more than sure that it is C.duplicareus that you have instead of adolfoi. The main difference is the black band over the top of the body. In adolfoi it is very slim and duplicareus is quite a bit broader.
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#8 mona o

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Posted 17 August 2006 - 01:57 PM

I know that my group has broader black bands than usual, but if one looks at their offspring I think it's more easy to see that they are C. adolfoi. They seem to produce adolfoi offspring anyway biggrin.gif
And Ian Fuller writes in his Cory id-book that C adolfoi is quite variable in colourations. He writes:
"The black pigment on the back of the body is broad in some specimens, narrow in others."

The photo of the juvenile below is taken just a few days ago, and I think it clearly shows a C. adolfoi
The fish on the picture is about 6 months, maybe younger (I have several ages).

Attached File  corydoras_adolfoi_ungfisk_13_august1.JPG   56.47KB   25 downloads
QUOTE(scotcat @ Aug 17 2006, 12:33 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The main difference is the black band over the top of the body. In adolfoi it is very slim and duplicareus is quite a bit broader.


#9 scotcat

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Posted 17 August 2006 - 02:33 PM

Yeh, looks like adolfoi at this age but I wonder how it will look in a years time. Have put this as a footnote in the article just published at http://www.scotcat.c...s/article88.htm
Thanks Mona.
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#10 mona o

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Posted 22 September 2006 - 03:30 AM

Well, what ever they are tongue.gif , C adolfoi or C duplicareus (or maybe a natural mix of both, they are wild caught after all?) I've now started up breeding them again after a long summer rest.
Right at this point I'm raising 3 batches of all the eggs and fry the spawning group has been producing:-)

I have two groups of fry from eggs laid and hatched in august, and they are growing steady on a diet of newly hatched BS. It's soon time to start feeding them other kinds of food, but earlier experience shows that they can be a bit slow and unwilling to accept prepeared foods.

The adult spawning group of 5 made a new spawning record recently and spawned 3 times in one week (last weekend), but I lost the two first batches. But the third time they spawned I collected eggs again, and they are now starting to hatch.
It's so much fun to breed and raise Corys biggrin.gif

The photos below shows one of the fry that hatched 15 th of august, and it's 5 and a half weeks old on the photos.
As you can see, I have oak leaves on the bottom of the tank. This provides much appreciated shelter for the fry, and they seek hiding under them instinctivly from the moment they hatch. I think it's important to give them this to reduce stress of beeing out in the open all the time, cause it scares them. Just my personal opinion:-)
The bb tank has no other decorations or sand, just the oak leaves.








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