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#1 Ashton

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Posted 21 April 2008 - 02:05 PM

I'm just about to start up a new small species tank 40 x 28 x 33 and was thinking about making it just Corydoras, and having 5 or 6 Corydoras Habrosus and Hastatus and some Otocinclus. But I've just been reading about Aspidoras pauciradiatus and was wondering what's the difference between Corydoras and Aspidoras, I can see a difference in body shapes, but is that all? Are these a smaller species than corries and if so where can I read more about them and would they fit into my new tank/

Also I can't seem to find any information about Dwarf Catfish, which ones would be suitable to be kept in a 35 litre tank? Can anyone help?

#2 scotcat

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Posted 21 April 2008 - 09:49 PM

Hi Ashton,

First of all welcome to the SC forums and we hope you enjoy tour stay here. smile.gif

I take it that the tank dimensions are in centimetres. which would make it roughly 16ins x 12ins x 13ins in old money smile.gif
I have 6 C.habrosus in a smaller tank than this with a sponge filter, sand and java moss and they are doing fine with water changes every 3/4 days. I think you should concentrate on one species with your small tank with maybe half a dozen, choosing from either habrosus, pygmaes or hastatus. You can find information on each of these species in the Factsheet section of the site.

Most Aspidoras are small with the largest getting to the 4.5-5cmm mark and pauciradiatus smaller. If you can get a hold of pauciradiatus you can also go for 6 of these. They are one of my favourite Aspidoras, not easy to spawn. I managed a few years ago but only got one fry.

There is an article/synopsis by myself on Aspidoras here. which was written about 3 years ago.

I suppose your choice of species will boil down to whatever you can get at the time. Good luck with your efforts.

P.S. You may be able to keep about three Otocinclus in the same tank but as long as you can keep the water changes up, as you would need to feed some veg. food such as cuccumber which can foul the water somewhat, better still would be to leave them out.
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#3 mummymonkey

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Posted 21 April 2008 - 10:42 PM

In addition to what Allan said, aspidoras have relatively smaller eyes.
I keep my pygmaeus in an 18 x 12 x 12 with weekly water changes and they breed like rabbits.
There can be upwards of 30 or 40 of the little fellows in there at times though only about a dozen adults.

#4 Ashton

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Posted 23 April 2008 - 06:09 PM

Thanks for the info, I'm a bit concerned about my Ph being 7.4 and a KH of 5. I'd love to try breeding some of these little fellow, but in the past I've only had Habrosus and can't manage to keep the males alive. The last 5 I bought I've only got the 3 females left and they seem happy enough in a 40 litre planted tank with Boraras. But I was wondering if the Aspidoras may fare a bit better

#5 scotcat

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Posted 23 April 2008 - 09:51 PM

Hi,

7.4 is a little highish but not critical. Better to buy from your own area where the fish have been acclimatised to the higher p.H. I myself had problems with the first batch of habrosus that I bought, when a couple of months down the line they just all died for no apparent reason, so maybe bad stock of some sort or other. This latest batch seem to be more healthier and feeding well.

Aspidoras are quite hardy as well but I find that you have to keep the water changes up to keep them healthy in a smaller tank, but I suppose that it would be the same regime for dwarf cory's as well anyway, but as I said before, whatever you can get your hands on in your area would determine what species you were going to work on.

The problem with higher p.H values is if you don't keep the water changes up you may end up with ammonia problems which can be fatal and may have been your problem with your batch of habrosus.....just a thought.
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#6 Ashton

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Posted 29 April 2008 - 05:57 PM

I'm glad to say I've picked up 5 of the most beautiful Aspidoras Pauciradiatus today, I didn't really want them for a while, but they are so rare I just snapped them up. They are now in a mature tank with my old Betta, who wont bother them. I may leave them there for a couple of months and see how things go.

Thanks for your help on this.

#7 scotcat

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Posted 29 April 2008 - 09:49 PM

QUOTE (Ashton @ Apr 29 2008, 05:57 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Thanks for your help on this.


No problem, enjoy your pauciraditaus as they are a joy, and as you say quite rare from time to time.

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