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A "drunk" Corydoras


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#1 Levantcat

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Posted 07 October 2008 - 03:21 PM

Over the past week or so, one of my two Corydoras's has been acting sick: He swims as if drunk and settles down on the surface quickly or on the nearest plant. Today he seemed near death (i haven't checked my 20 gal tank in the last 1 hr). He appears pale. No growths are seen. I have had him for nearly 9 mos. His previous partner was found dead over 6 months ago and I bought another who seems to be OK. The other denizens appear OK, though one of my platy's had developed a swollen eye a week ago which has now cleared, and a few of the platys have died over the past several months (I am now on my third generation of these). Altogether I have 5 adult platys, about 8 or so juveniles with occasional fry added, an asian algae eater, 4 mollies and 8 neon tetras (the newest additions). The water is kept at 27 deg C (about 81 deg F) and the tank is heavily planted, with the plants supplying the oxygen. The CO-2, Ammonia, nitrites and nitrates all test "within normal limits". I have a bacterial powered filter system (Eheim Professional) which seems to be working fine. I feed the fish daily with granulated food, and must admit that I haven't been generous with the additional tablets meant for the bottom feeders. Could it be that the poor fish (who I've named "dopey" because from the start he would overlook the tablets when they were right by hm) has been malnourished and is dying of that?
I am grateful in advance for your site, since I am a novice aquarist, and found your site by googling Corydoras and disease.

#2 mummymonkey

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Posted 07 October 2008 - 06:31 PM

Welcome to Scotcat.
It's difficult enough identifying ailments in one's own tanks. Offering diagnosis and treatment advice on the internet is rarely productive. I can only repeat the advice I give to anybody with persistant problems which is to increase your water changes both in quantity and frequency.

With your own specific setup I would say some of your fish have very different requirements in terms of water conditions. Also the Asian algae eater may be harassing your catfish. It's perhaps a little on the warm side too.

#3 Levantcat

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Posted 07 October 2008 - 07:40 PM

QUOTE (mummymonkey @ Oct 7 2008, 08:31 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Welcome to Scotcat.
It's difficult enough identifying ailments in one's own tanks. Offering diagnosis and treatment advice on the internet is rarely productive. I can only repeat the advice I give to anybody with persistant problems which is to increase your water changes both in quantity and frequency.

With your own specific setup I would say some of your fish have very different requirements in terms of water conditions. Also the Asian algae eater may be harassing your catfish. It's perhaps a little on the warm side too.



#4 Levantcat

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Posted 07 October 2008 - 07:46 PM

Thanks for your response. I couldn't agree with you more about the difficulty and risks involved in making long distance diagnoses (more on that later). The algae eater's never been harrassing "Dopey". My question was only to see if there was a known disorder with Corydoras which corresponds to what I'm seeing. As I said in my posting, I am really new at this. BTW: I am a physician, a diagnostic imaging specialist ("radiologist") and some of my work does include long distance diagnosis over the internet, but those are digitized medical imaging studies. With best wishes, Levantcat.

#5 scotcat

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Posted 07 October 2008 - 08:40 PM

Hi and welcome to the SC forums. I have moved your topic by the way to here, the South American forum.

I would agree with mummymonkey and as he says the temperature seems a little high for Corydoras. There are only a few that can stand the higher temperatures, Corydoras sterbai for instance but in the main they will do better at a mid 70sF regime and it is also very possible that he has caught something from the Platy's and has an internal bacterial problem. Corydoras are hardy fish but when something like this happens it can be very hard to halt the decline in the fish and I am afraid it doesn't look too good for him/her.
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