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Ancistrus tolima Taphorn, Armbruster, Villa-Navarro & Ray, 2013

Image contributors to this species:

Donald Taphorn (1)

ScotCat Sources:

Etymology = Genus Etymology = Species

Other Sources:

Fishbase  Search Google  All Catfish Species Inventory
 

Relevant Information:

Typical Ancistrus shape with both sexes sporting bristles to the head area with the male having the larger and more impressive tentacles. Aquarium Care: Quite an easy species to keep as long as there is adequate aeration in the aquarium and giving them a choice of pipes, stones or rockwork. Breeding: As per the Ancistrus family in neutral to mildly alkaline water. Will spawn in caves/pipes. Remarks: Ancistrus tolima has a very restricted range (extent of EOO = 160 km²). It lives in a single creek of about 10 km² that is isolated by a dam. The species is genetically isolated. There is subsistence agriculture in the area, and run-off of agrochemicals is affecting habitat quality. The creek is a dry area that is affected by sudden temperature changes and thus highly sensitive to climate change. For instance, during El Niño event, water quantity in the creek can be reduced to 20% of normal levels. Hence, the species is listed as Endangered. The creek in which this species lives flows into another creek, which in turn flows into a dam that was built in 1971 (the species was discovered in 2005 but only described in 2013). In other words, the species is genetically isolated and restricted to an area of about 10 km² because there is no connection with the main river (Magdalena). There is subsistence agriculture in the area of the creek; the run-off of agrochemicals affects habitat quality. The area is the northernmost limit of the tropical dry forest on the western slope of the eastern Cordillera; it is a dry area that is affected by sudden temperature changes and thus highly sensitive to climate change. For instance, during El Niño events water quantity in the creek can be reduced to 20% of normal levels. (IUCN Red List). It has been found in a creek with sand and gravel substrate, abundant organic material, and steep banks with little shoreline vegetation (Taphorn et al. 2013).

Common Name:

None

Synonyms:

None

Family:

Loricariidae

Distribution:

South America: Upper Magdalena River drainage, subdrainage río Prado in Colombia. Type Locality: Quebrada El Pascado, 3.599306° N, -74.854556° W, vereda San Pablo, municipio de Dolores, departamento de Tolima, Colombia.

Size:

7.5cm. (3ins)

Temp:

24-28°c (75-83°f.)

p.H.

6.0-7.5.

Reference:

Taphorn, D.C., J.W. Armbruster, F. Villa-Navarro and C.K. Ray, 2013. Trans-Andean Ancistrus (Siluriformes: Loricariidae). Zootaxa 3641(4):343-370.
Froese, R. and D. Pauly. Editors. 2018.FishBase. World Wide Web electronic publication. www.fishbase.org, ( 06/2018 )
Villa-Navarro, F., Mesa-Salazar, L., Lasso, C. & Sanchez-Duarte, P. 2016. Ancistrus tolima. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2016: e.T64792614A64890560. http://dx.doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.UK.2016-1.RLTS.T64792614A64890560.en.

 

 

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                                                                                                                                                                     updated = October 16, 2018 © ScotCat 1997-2018