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Baryancistrus chrysolomus Rapp Py-Daniel, Zuanon & Ribeiro de Oliveira, 2011


ou may recognise this species in this months factsheet (October 2011) as Baryancistrus sp. L047 and you would be right and as of this year (2011) this Loricaria has been described along with the gold nugget pleco (Baryancistrus xanthellus) by Py-Daniel et al in their paper, "Two new ornamental loricariid catfishes of Baryancistrus from rio Xingu drainage (Siluriformes: Hypostominae). Neotropical Ichthyology 9, pp. 241–252."

 

Baryancistrus chrysolomus

 

 

This is one of my favourite Loricarias for the larger aquarium although they are not really a species for the beginner in the hobby as they are specialised feeders and tend to be territorial as adults. They might not be as brightly coloured as some other members of this family, never the less the subtle differences between the body and fin edge colours are in my mind very impressive.

 

This species is known from the Rio Xingu, in the area called Volta Grande do rio Xingu, immediately above Belo Monte falls and below the village of Belo Monte, and from Rio Curuá, Rio Iriri, which is the the largest tributary of the Rio Xingu.

 

Below you can see the male of the species with the long interopercular spines on the cheeks and the broader head.

 

Baryancistrus chrysolomus = head view

 

Adults occur under large flat rocks settled directly on the river bottom, in places with considerable amounts of fine sediments. Young individuals inhabit marginal areas of the rapids, near the river banks, usually just one or two individuals. They occupy under rocks in places with slow to moderate flowing waters, usually with sediment accumulation over the rocks and river bottom. Based on two specimens, this species feeds mainly on diatoms and occasionally on invertebrate larvae associated with fine sediments and sand grains.

 

This species can be distinguished from all its congeners, except Baryancistrus xanthellus, by the presence of a broad orange to yellow band along the entire distal border of dorsal and caudal fin (vs. all fins without yellow bands). This genus is large and high backed. They have a large suckermouth with a high number of slender and long stemmed teeth. A small membrane lies behind the last ray of the dorsal fin which joins the anal fin. Found in shallow fast flowing areas of water with a stony substrate.

 

Prefers higher temperatures and adults can prove to be territorial.

 

 

Characteristics

Dorsal spines (total): 2; Dorsal soft rays (total): 7; Anal soft rays: 5. This genus is large and high backed. They have a large suckermouth with a high number of slender and long stemmed teeth. A small membrane lies behind the last ray of the dorsal fin which joins the anal fin. Head large and wide; snout round in dorsal view. Eye large and round, iris operculum present. Orbit not elevated; interorbital area flat. No ridge between eyes and nares. Supraoccipital process not elevated, almost indistinct from rest of bone, round posteriorly and elevated. Supraoccipital limited by a pair of large quadrangular plates tightly connected. Predorsal area reduced, with one pair of separated diamond shaped plates anterior to nuchal plate.

 

Colour
Broad orange to yellow band along the entire distal border of dorsal and caudal fin. Body dark brown to olive at dorsum and sides,
paler ventrally. Very faint pale spots over body, hardly visible on fins. Juveniles with whitish orange band on distal fourth of caudal and dorsal fins, narrower in adults.

Compatibility
Larger Characins such as the Congo Tetras from Africa. As the genus Baryancistrus likes higher temperatures you could may be research companions that will be able to sustain these parameters, such as non-aggresive South American Cichlids.

Breeding
No reports although the gold nugget pleco, Baryancistrus xanthellus, has been bred before.

Sexual Diferences

Mature males have a broader and longer head and longer pectoral fin spines.

 

Feeding

Vegetarian diet, and will also eat plants in the aquarium. Tablet foods and insect larvae.


Etymology
Baryancistrus: Greek, barys = heavy/sturdy (Ancistrus)+ Greek, agkistron = hook.
chrysolomus: From the Greek chryso, meaning orange or yellow and loma meaning border, in allusion to the coloured band at the border of the dorsal and caudal fins. A noun in apposition.

References

Seidel, Ingo; Back to Nature guide to L-catfishes 208 p.
Py-Daniel, LR, J Zuanon and RR de Oliveira (2011) Two new ornamental loricariid catfishes of Baryancistrus from rio Xingu drainage (Siluriformes: Hypostominae). Neotropical Ichthyology 9, pp. 241–252

 

Glossary

Adipose fin: Fleshy finlike projection without rays, behind the rayed dorsal fin.

Dorsal fin: The primary rayed fin(s) on top of the body

Caudal fin: The paired fins after head and before anal fin.
Anal fin: The fin forward from the anal cavity.
Interorbital: The space between the orbits of the eyes.
Supraoccipital: Unpaired bone at the back of the skull, usually with a crest.

Nuchal: Area between the skull and dorsal fin.


Photo Credits

Danny Blundel @ The Danny Blundell Photo Gallery

Factsheet 184

 

Synonyms:
None
Common Name:
L047, Magnum Pleco
Family:
Loricariidae
Subfamily:
Ancistrinae
Distribution:
Brazil: Rio Xingu, in the area called Volta Grande do rio Xingu, immediately above Belo Monte falls and below Belo Monte village, and from Rio Curuá, Rio Iriri, the larger tributary of Rio Xingu.
Size: 
35.0cm. (14ins)
Temp:
26-30°c (79-87°f.)
pH.:
6.0 - 7.2.
Donation:
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                                                                                                                                Factsheet 184 = updated March 1, 2016 , © ScotCat 1997-2016 Go to Top