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Akysis prashadi (Hora 1936)

Following swiftly on from last months factsheet on Akysis longifilis by contributor Steve Grant, we herald in a new year (2008) with another member of the same genus, the "Indawgyi stream catfish", Akysis prashadi, and another contribution by regular subscriber and webmaster of the Hillstream catfish site, Adrian Taylor. Adrian is also secretary of the Catfish Study Group and with no further ado I will hand you over.


kysis prashadi is one of the largest of the species, one that we find frequently in our local fish stores today, and one that is highly active when feeding.

 

 

 

Akysis prashadi

 

 



In general their markings differ slightly from specimen to specimen, although their general appearance and colouration remains consistent. Generally speaking the head is a golden tan with brown speckles to it in colour, with the body also having a golden tan colouration to it, which contain three areas of dark brown along the body, the first running from the pectoral fin and ending level with the posterior edge of the dorsal fin, the second area starts midway between the ventral and anal fin and ending level with the posterior edge of the adipose fin, the third area runs through the caudal peduncle. There are thin brown irregular lines connecting these three bands, in some specimens these connecting lines can be absent or extremely thin, but generally it is usually the connecting line between the adipose and caudal brown areas that is hard to discern.

Sexing is relatively easy with the female having larger ventral and pectoral fins. There have been reports of their spawning, but as yet there are no reports of fry development.

 

 

Akysis prashadi


Like other members of its genera, Akysis prashadi is more at home in aquaria having a sand substrate interspersed with small rocks and pebbles mixed with thick clumps of plants. Unless feeding, when they are highly active, they can be over looked in aquaria that has a sand substrate as they like nothing better than to bury themselves, leaving only their nasal barbels which protrude slightly from the sand to indicate where they are. So the next time you see a tank labelled ‘Akysis’ and there appears to be an empty tank, check the substrate to see if you see any barbels protruding out of the substrate.

Water conditions although not critical, (as long as it is low in nitrates) should be provided with a temperature range of between 18°C and 27°C, and pH values of between 6.5 and 7.2.

Feeding Akysis prashadi does not cause any difficulty, as long as you use frozen or live foods such as bloodworms, brine shrimps, white worms and daphnia, as they tend to ignore commercially prepared foods.



Akysis hendricksoni

Akysis hendricksoni


Akysis hendricksoni is often confused with Akysis prashadi and can be misidentified as such by our local fish stores, yet can be readily distinguished from Akysis prashadi by being somewhat smaller, having a narrower head and more closely set eyes.



Characteristics
Dorsal spines (total): 1 - 1; Dorsal soft rays (total): 4 - 5; Vertebrae: 34 – 35. Posterior edge of pectoral spine without serrations. Head length 20.6-23.8% SL; head width 21.4-25.1% SL; interorbital distance 35-37% HL; length of nasal barbel 63-68% HL. Caudal fin deeply emarginate.

Colour
Head is a golden tan with brown speckles to it in colour, with the body also having a golden tan colouration to it, which contain three areas of dark brown along the body, the first running from the pectoral fin and ending level with the posterior edge of the dorsal fin, the second area starts midway between the ventral and anal fin and ending level with the posterior edge of the adipose fin, the third area runs through the caudal peduncle. There are thin brown irregular lines connecting these three bands, in some specimens these connecting lines can be absent or extremely thin, but generally it is usually the connecting line between the adipose and caudal brown areas that is hard to discern.

Compatibility

Fish like barbs and rasbora’s make excellent tank mates, however as they have quite wide mouths, any fry from livebearers or fish around that size would be readily predated upon.

Breeding

In their natural habitat they lay their eggs in nests constructed by the males in shallow, rocky areas in the summer months.

There have been reported spawings in the home aquarium as well as in Public Aquaria.

Sexual differences
The females have larger ventral fins and deeper pectoral fins.

Feeding
Frozen or live foods such as bloodworms, brine shrimps, white worms and daphnia, as they tend to ignore commercially prepared foods.

Glossary of Terms
Dorsal : The primary rayed fin(s) on top of the body
Pectoral: The paired fins after head and before anal fin.
Posterior: The tail end of the fish. Situated behind.
Interorbital: The space between the orbits of the eyes.
Nasal Barbels: On top of the head, by the nostrils.

 
Etymology

Akysis: A = without; kysis = bladder, in reference to the lack of a swimbladder.
prashadi:
Named after the Indian ichthyologist, Dr. B. Prashad.

References
Froese, R. and D. Pauly. Editors. 2007.FishBase. World Wide Web electronic publication. www.fishbase.org, version (10/2007).
Hillstream Catfish: online resource: http://www.hillstreamcatfish.com/index.html

Photo Credits

 nos: 1 @ 2: © Adrian Taylor @   Hillstream Catfish

no.3:            © Zhou Hang

Factsheet 139

Synonyms:
Akysis variegatus variegatus
Common Name:
Indawgyi stream catfish
Family:
Akysidae
Subfamily:

Akysinae

Distribution:
Asia: Irrawaddy river drainage, Myanmar.
Size: 
6.5cm (2½ins)
Temp:
18-27°C (63-81°F)
pH.:
6.5 -7.2.
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                                                                                                                                        Factsheet 139 = updated August 12, 2016 , © ScotCat 1997-2016 Go to Top