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Synodontis robertsi  Poll, 1974

Image contributors to this species:

Allan James (2) Hippocampus Bildarchiv (1) K. A. Webb (1)

 ScotCat Sources:

Factsheet Article Etymology = Genus Etymology = species

Other Sources:

Fishbase  Google Search  All Catfish Species Inventory
 

Relevant Information:

This species can be confused with the much larger Synodontis caudalis but the point to look out for in S. robertsi is the unusual large eyes similar to S. alberti, the bigger ornate pattern on the body and short barbels, while S. caudalis has smaller eyes, longer barbels, and also grows larger at 20cm SL, it can also be territorial when larger. S. robertsi has a deeply forked caudal fin similar to S. caudalis with the top lobe being slightly longer than the bottom lobe. S. robertsi has a stripe running from the eye to the mouth. Aquarium Care: Synodontis robertsi is a very peacfull fish and a prime candidate for an average sized community tank. Diet: The usual feeding for Synodontis species, being good quality flake food, tablet food, frozen bloodworm, shrimp and prawns.    

Common Name:

Roberts Catfish

Synonyms:

None

Family:

Mochokidae blycipitidae

Distribution:

Africa: known from the type locality, River Lukenie, Central Democratic Republic of  the  Congo. Type locality: Riv. Lukenie à Elombe, ferry landing, lat. 2º49'S, long.18º14'E.

Size:

7.5cm. (3ins)

Temp:

22-26°C (71 -79°F)

p.H.

6.2 -7.5.

Reference:

ScotCat Factsheet no 18. Dec.1997

 

 

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                                                                                              updated = October 8, 2017 © ScotCat 1997-2017